University of Maine at Farmington 2015-2016 Catalog
 
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Academic Policies
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The following section describes policies and procedures that the the University of Maine at Farmington community will follow in academic areas.

Academic Advising

Academic Advising

Advising Mission Statement
 
The role of advising is to help students make choices and, in the process, to help them learn how to make good decisions and solve problems on their own.
 
Advising Vision
 
Advising goes beyond the traditional notion of the academic advisor helping in course selection and career advice, and includes working to assure that a student's educational experience supports the development of the whole student. Advising takes place at every level at the university: by staff, in the residence halls, in the classroom, by professors other than the academic advisor, and in extra-curricular and co-curricular activities. Advising is not limited to academic guidance, but includes working to assure a student's educational experience supports the development of the whole student. This envisions faculty, staff and students as partners in helping students identify their values and develop as individuals. Advising relates to the whole student, including the mental, emotional, spiritual, social, and physical aspects of life. Advising so defined is the core process integrating the educational experience at Farmington, helping students become confident participants in their education, cognizant of their own values and priorities, determined to be life-long learners, curious, enthused and open minded with a strong sense of both ethics and community.
 
Advising Responsibilities
 
Student Responsibilities:
  • Participate fully as an active learner in the advising process;
  • Take the initiative to contact his/her advisor in a timely fashion;
  • Be prepared for advising sessions, gathering all relevant information needed to make informed choices;
  • Articulate personal values, goals, and aspirations;
  • Accept ownership of his/her educational choices;
  • Maintain a personal record of academic progress;
  • Know and meet graduation and other requirements.
 
Academic Advisor Responsibilities:
  • Help students learn to make choices and, in the process, teach them how to make decisions and solve problems on their own;
  • Assist students in the pre-registration and registration process, providing timely communication and accurate information;
  • Discuss linkages between academic preparation, personal experience, and future career paths;
  • Assist students with planning an academic program consistent with student abilities, interests, and potential for growth;
  • Function as the point of reception and clearinghouse for information relating to advising responsibilities shared with other University personnel;
  • Refer students to campus services and resources as needed;
  • Monitor student progress and provide accurate feedback.

Academic Integrity Code

The students and faculty at UMF are dedicated to upholding the highest standards of academic integrity. To that end, we have created a written Academic Integrity Code that sets forth, in detail, these principles. This Executive Summary is intended to give the reader an overview of the UMF Academic Integrity Code (hereafter called the Code).
 
In upholding the highest standards of academic integrity, we recognize the critical importance of the following core values. Each of these core values is discussed in more detail in the Code.
  • Honesty
  • Trust
  • Respect
  • Reputation
 
Faculty members and students are expected not only to learn the principles contained in the Academic Integrity Code, but also to fulfill certain responsibilities in upholding the Code. This means that faculty members are expected to report all suspected violations as described in the Code, and to take reasonable measures to discourage dishonesty. Students, as part of the academic community, also have a responsibility to respond to violations of academic integrity that they witness. The Code describes the responsibilities for both parties as well as the processes to follow.
 
Many different examples of violating academic integrity exist, and these are listed and defined in the Code. It is important to remember that the Code applies to all academic work at UMF, whether it is in a face-to-face class, an on-line class, or a hybrid of the two.
 
When faculty members suspect a violation of the Code, they are expected to complete an Academic Integrity Violation Form (available on myCampus) and meet with the student to discuss the alleged violation. Unless resolved otherwise at this meeting, the form is forwarded to the Student Conduct Officer, who will arrange a meeting with the student to discuss the options for responding to the allegation. These include pleading no contest, admitting to the charge but contesting the recommended sanction, and contesting the charge. Some cases must go to a hearing before the Student Conduct Committee for resolution. The Code describes the processes that unfold depending on the student’s plea. Students have the opportunity to appeal sanctions imposed, and these procedures are described in the Code.
 
Faculty members also have the option of completing a Minor Violation Form (available on myCampus) in cases where a warning is warranted instead of a full-fledged action. Copies of the form are kept by the Student Conduct Officer. Three minor violation reports will result in the last reporting faculty member being asked to submit an Academic Integrity Violation Form.
 
Faculty and students are strongly encouraged to read the full Academic Integrity Code as part of their commitment to academic integrity at UMF. Ignorance and carelessness are not justifications for violation of the code.
 
 
UMF Academic Integrity Code
 
We, the students and faculty of the University of Maine Farmington (UMF), dedicate ourselves to upholding the highest standards of academic integrity.  As members of the UMF community, as well as the broader community of seekers of knowledge and truth, we affirm academic integrity as a central value because we recognize the following:
 
HONESTY: The purpose of education is to attain knowledge and develop skills, and this purpose is achieved only through academically honest work. When students create academically dishonest assignments, they do not receive the full benefits of their courses; moreover, they prevent instructors from accurately gauging the capabilities of their students and, thus, prevent instruction from being offered at an effective level.
 
TRUST: Education flourishes in a climate of trust. Students, in devoting time and energy to their academic assignments, need to know that their peers are not seeking an unfair advantage over them, and instructors, in devoting careful attention to their students' work, need to know that the work is that of their students. Only academically honest actions establish and sustain trust among students and between students and faculty.
 
RESPECT: Education flourishes in a climate of respect for intellectual and artistic labor, and the rigorous adherence to the standards of academic integrity, especially the conventions for acknowledging one's use of others' words and ideas, is essential to such a climate.
 
REPUTATION: The reputation of UMF and the value of a UMF diploma depend on the genuine accomplishments of UMF graduates and, thus, on the academic integrity of the entire UMF community.
 
Academic integrity means that one's work is the product of one's own effort, and one neither receives nor gives unauthorized assistance in any assignment. Because advanced academic work depends on the sharing of information and ideas, academic integrity at the college level includes rigorous adherence to the conventions for acknowledging one's use of the words and ideas of other people, and instruction in this fundamental skill of college life is available to all UMF students.
 
By steadfastly adhering to the highest standards of academic integrity, we strive for excellence and fashion ourselves true leaders.
 
RESPONSIBLITIES:
 
All members of the UMF community are responsible for learning the standards of academic integrity and ensuring that all of their work meets them. Students will be held to the standards of the Academic Integrity Code. If students have questions about the academic integrity of their work, they should discuss these with their instructors before turning in the work. Ignorance and carelessness are not justifications for violation of the code.
 
Faculty members are expected to report all suspected violations of the Academic Integrity Code integrity through the procedures that are detailed below. These procedures are designed to create a fair and consistent system for dealing with alleged violations of the code. Of course, faculty members should also take reasonable measures to discourage academic dishonesty -- for example, including in the syllabus a statement about academic integrity that clarifies any specific guidelines for the course, instructing students in any procedures of academic integrity within the discipline that are especially challenging, and proctoring examinations.
 
As part of the academic community, students are strongly encouraged to respond to violations of academic integrity that they witness. It is especially recommended that a student promptly report the violation to the instructor of the course in which it occurred. It is also acceptable, depending on individual circumstances, for a student to speak to the perpetrator of the violation, explaining his or her disapproval. Students who are not certain how they wish to respond to a violation should feel free to consult with faculty members or advisors; in asking for guidance, students are not committing themselves to making a formal allegation.
 
VIOLATIONS:
Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to, the actions defined below. It is important to note that these violations apply to academic work at UMF regardless of course delivery method (face-to-face, on-line, or a hybrid).
 
Plagiarism: the representation of others' words or ideas as one's own. For example,
 
Submitting as one's own work an examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project (laboratory report, artistic work, computer program, etc.) that was created entirely or partially by someone else.
 
Failure to use quotation marks to signal that one is using another person's precise words. Even brief phrases must be enclosed in quotation marks.
 
Creating an academically dishonest paraphrase. When paraphrasing (presenting another person's ideas or information in one's own words), one must find truly one's own way of expressing the original meaning. Simply inserting synonyms into the source's sentence structures is plagiarism.
 
Failure to identify the source of quotations and paraphrases. Of course one must cite the source of quotations; one must also cite the source of ideas and information that is not common knowledge even when paraphrased (presented in one's own words). Sources include unpublished as well as published items -- for example, books, articles, material on the internet, television programs, instructors' lectures, and people, including other students, friends, and relatives.
 
Failure to identify the source of the elements of a nonverbal work (for example, a painting, dance, musical composition, or mathematical proof) that are derived from the work of others.
 
Cheating: the use or attempted use of unauthorized assistance in an examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project. For example,
 
  • Copying answers from another student's examination.
  • Communicating in any way with another student or a third party during an examination without the permission of the instructor.
  • Using unauthorized materials or devices (including notes, textbooks, calculators, and communication devices) during an examination without the permission of the instructor.
  • Obtaining and/or reading a copy of an examination before its administration without the permission of the instructor.
  • Collaborating with other students or third parties on a take-home examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project without the permission of the instructor.
Fabrication includes:
 
  • Fabrication of Data: Inventing or falsifying the data of a laboratory experiment, field project, or other project.
  • Fabrication of a Citation: Inventing a phony citation for a research paper or other project.
  • Alteration of an Assignment: Altering a graded examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project and resubmitting it to the instructor in order to claim an error in grading.
  • Duplicate Work: Submitting a paper or other project in more than one course without the permission of the instructors. Students are expected to produce original work for each course. A student should not submit identical or substantially similar papers or projects in two different courses (in the same or different semesters) unless both instructors have given their permission.
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: assisting another student's academic dishonesty. For example,
                        - Writing a paper or other project for another student.
 
                        - Allowing another student to copy from one's examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project.
 
                        - Assisting another student on a take-home examination, paper, homework assignment, or other project if one knows or suspects such assistance is not
                          authorized by the instructor.
 
  • Other Forms of Dishonest Conduct: any actions by which one seeks an unfair advantage over others. For example,
                        - Destroying or altering the academic work of another student.
 
 
Procedures:
 
1. Alleged violations of the Academic Integrity Code are to be reported as soon as they have been detected. There is a two year statute of limitations on all charges of academic dishonesty, beginning at the conclusion of the semester in which the violation is alleged to have occurred.
 
2. Faculty who suspect that a student has violated the Academic Integrity Code are expected to fill out an Academic Integrity Violation Form in order to document the alleged violation. When completing the Academic Integrity Violation Form, the instructor has the option of recommending sanctions.  These sanctions can include, but are not limited to, the following:
 
reduction of one full letter grade in the course (the recommended minimum sanction for a first offense), receipt of a grade of F for the course, redoing the assignment, additional assignments, attendance at ethics seminars, and immediate referral to the Student Conduct Committee.  
 
If the instructor's recommended sanction is an X transcript notation, this sanction will be imposed after review by the Student Conduct Officer. For a first offense, this sanction can be imposed only if recommended by the faculty member.[1]
 
3. Once an Academic Integrity Violation Form has been completed, the faculty member must meet with the student to discuss the alleged violation. If, during the course of this meeting, the faculty member becomes convinced that he or she was mistaken, the Academic Integrity Violation Form will be destroyed and the matter will be considered resolved. If, however, the faculty member continues to suspect that a violation of the Academic Integrity Code has taken place, then the faculty member retains the original, gives the student a copy, and forwards copies to the student's advisor and the Student Conduct Officer (normally the VP for Student and Community Services).
 
4. Minor Violations:  When the instructor feels the violation merits a warning instead of a full-fledged action, a Minor Violation may be filed.
  • As with major violations, the instructor must meet with the student to discuss the alleged violation. 
  • Sanctions for minor violations are determined by the instructor. 
  • Minor violation forms are confidential and are kept on file in the Vice President for Student and Community Services office. After three minor violation reports have been submitted for a student, the VPSCS will inform the last reporting faculty member of the pattern of offenses, and ask the faculty member to proceed with a full charge against the student.
  • The Minor Violations form can be found on myCampus under Forms and Documents.
 
The Student Conduct Officer/Committee:
 
5. Upon receipt of the Academic Integrity Violation Form, the Student Conduct Officer will arrange to meet with the student to discuss the student's options for responding to the allegation.  Students may (1) Plead No Contest, (2) Admit to the Charge but Contest the Recommended Sanction, (3.) Contest the Charge.  Discussion of these pleas and the consequence of each follows in the Sanctions section.
 
6. After the initial meeting with the student, the Student Conduct Officer will create a confidential Academic Integrity Violation File for the student. Any written statements submitted by the complaining faculty member or student as clarification of their positions regarding the alleged violation will be placed in this file for possible review by the Student Conduct Committee and as a means of tracking repeat offenders. The contents of Academic Integrity Violation Files will be retained for one year after the student graduates or for four years after the student withdraws from UMF.
 
Academic Misconduct Hearings:
 
7. All cases involving repeat violators, as determined by the Student Conduct Officer based on the contents of a student's Academic Integrity Violation File, and any cases in which the faculty member recommends a hearing will automatically trigger a hearing before the Student Conduct Committee. The Student Conduct Officer is responsible for scheduling this hearing and will notify all interested parties of the time and location of the scheduled hearing and the composition of the Student Conduct Committee which will hear the case. Pending resolution of the case, the student will receive a grade of NG for the course if the semester concludes before the hearing is held.
 
8. Hearings will be conducted according to established University of Maine system guidelines. These guidelines can be found at http://www.maine.edu/policyscc501.html.
 
9. If the student is exonerated, a notice of acquittal will be placed in the student's Academic Integrity Violation File until the expiration of the two year statute of limitations for that particular charge in order to prevent double jeopardy. All other records of that case will be destroyed. Notations of acquittal will have no bearing on any future cases and may not be entered as evidence in future hearings.
 
10. While their case is pending or after they have been found In Violation of the Academic Integrity Code, students may not withdraw from the course in which the alleged or proven violation occurred.
 
Pleas and Sanctions:
 
It is crucial that instructors and the Student Conduct Committee have the latitude to select a sanction that is appropriate for the specific circumstances of each case, but it is also vital that a sanction reflect the principles of a community that has explicitly pledged itself to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity. This section of the code attempts to articulate a clear but flexible framework to assist instructors and the committee in the important task of assigning sanctions.
 
Student Pleas:
 
a) Students may plead no contest to the charge by signing the appropriate line on the form. If they choose this option, the academic sanctions recommended by the instructor automatically apply.
 
b) Students may contest the severity of the faculty member's recommended non-grade related sanctions by signing the appropriate line of the Academic Integrity Violation Form. If they choose this option, they admit that the alleged violation of the Academic Integrity Code occurred and request a hearing. The Student Conduct Officer will refer the matter to the Student Conduct Committee. Imposed sanctions may reduce, uphold, increase or supersede the faculty member's non-grade related recommendation.  Student Conduct Committee hearings will be scheduled by the Student Conduct Officer. Students contesting recommended faculty sanctions may submit written statements to the Student Conduct Officer clarifying their position at any time prior to their scheduled hearing. Students wishing to contest grade related sanctions must pursue a separate appeal as outlined in the UMF catalog.
 
c) Students may contest the allegation of academic dishonesty by signing the appropriate line on the Academic Integrity Violation Form. If they choose this option, a hearing before the Student Conduct Committee will be scheduled by the Student Conduct Officer. Students contesting allegations may submit written statements to the Student Conduct Officer clarifying their position at any time prior to their scheduled hearing. While the allegation of academic dishonesty is being contested, students will retain all of the rights and privileges as an enrolled student, including within the course where the violation is alleged to have occurred. Furthermore, no sanctions will be applied pending the outcome of the Student Conduct Committee's deliberations.
 
Sanctions which may be imposed by the Student Conduct Committee upon a Finding of Guilt:
 
For a first major violation:
If the Student Conduct Committee subsequently finds that the student is in violation of the Academic Integrity Code, then the matter will be returned to the faculty member for the application of grade related sanctions.
 
The recommended minimum sanction will be the reduction of one full letter grade in the course (e.g. B to C); the maximum sanction will be a grade of F for the course accompanied by a transcript notation of X, which means Failure due to academic dishonesty.
 
In the special case of a first violation that occurs in a course that is graded pass/fail, the sanction conforms to the spirit of this schedule, but, given the limited range of grades, the sanction need not necessarily result in failure of the course.
 
In any course, additional action, including but not limited to the following, may apply: repeating the assignment, extra assignments, and attendance at ethics seminars. Moreover, all first violators are ineligible for the next Dean's List.
 
For a second major violation:
The minimum sanction will be a course grade of F accompanied by a transcript notation of X.
 
All second violators are ineligible for all future academic honors and awards, including all future Dean's Lists, departmental and university awards, and graduation honors.
 
The Committee may also impose additional non-grade related sanctions, including suspension or expulsion from the university.  The maximum sanction for current students will be expulsion from the university and, for students whose violation is determined after graduation, revocation of the degree.
 
For a third major violation:
The sanction will be expulsion from the university or revocation of the degree.
 
 
Petitioning for Removal of X and Other Appeals:
 
Since the Student Conduct Committee has no authority over grades, students found In Violation of the Academic Integrity Code may pursue a separate appeal of any grade related sanctions under the grade grievance process outlined in the UMF catalog.
Students who have received a notation of X along with an F on their transcript as a sanction for violating the Academic Integrity Code will receive instructions from the Student Conduct Officer for petition to remove the X. After a period of 12 months beginning at the end of the semester in which the violation occurred, students may appeal in writing to the Student Conduct Committee for removal of the notation. The Committee's decision will then be communicated in writing to the student, instructor, and the student's advisor. If the Committee's decision is to remove the X notation, the Merrill Center will also be informed.
Students found in violation of the Academic Integrity Code who wish to contest the Student Conduct Committee's ruling and/or the sanctions imposed by the Committee may appeal directly to the Provost who will be the President's designee on such matters. Appeals, in writing and marked confidential, must be sent to the Provost within seven calendar days of the Student Conduct Committee's ruling. The Provost's decision will then be communicated in writing to the student, instructor, Student Conduct Officer, the student's faculty advisor, and the members of the Student Conduct Committee.

 


[1]Although treated like an F in the computation of grade point average and determination of academic standing, the X transcript notation is designed to emphasize the uniquely grievous nature of academic dishonesty. A strong deterrent (especially to students whose weak performance in a course might make the threat of a mere grade penalty, even an F, negligible), the X notation is also designed to foster genuine rehabilitation because a student who receives an XF is invited to petition to have the X removed from the F after a year.

Placement Testing

The UMF Learning Assistance Center administers placement tests in mathematics and writing. These tests are designed to ensure that students meet minimum competencies in basic skills areas. Test results assist faculty advisors in assuring early and accurate placement of students in appropriate courses.

Students who, based on their placement test scores, are required to enroll in a developmental mathematics course must:       
  • enroll in their required developmental mathematics course within their first two semesters at UMF,

  • successfully complete the course by the end of their fourth semester (second year), and

  • enroll in their general education math course within one year of passing the developmental mathematics course, preferably in the next semester.

For more information on testing click here http://learnassist.umf.maine.edu/placement-testing/

Disability Services

The University of Maine at Farmington is committed to providing both access and accommodations to students with disabilities. We provide academic and support services necessary to ensure that students with disabilities have both the physical and programmatic access they need to enjoy a full campus life. Individuals have the right, and the responsibility, to decide whether they want to take advantage of the services available to them.

Any UMF student with a physical, hearing, visual, medical, emotional, or learning disability is eligible for services. When a disability is not otherwise apparent, documentation may be required. Documentation should be current and include a description of the disability, disability-related needs, and specific recommendations for services. This information is confidential, is not part of the student's permanent record, and will be released only upon express written request of the individual.

Course Registration Policy

During the pre-registration period, students will meet with faculty advisors to choose courses for the next semester. Course registration will be by class level, with seniors registering first and first-year students registering last in a two-week period that follows the advising. In order to allow all students the opportunity to receive an optimal choice of courses, schedule changes will not be permitted during this initial registration period.

Students who have officially notified the Merrill Center that they will be on leave can register with their class.

By registering at the University of Maine at Farmington, students agree to pay all charges on their tuition and fee accounts when due. They also acknowledge that failure to make a required payment by the stated deadline can result in late payment and service charges, inability to register for a future term, and/or withholding of a transcript and/or diploma.

A student's registration may also be blocked if immunizations have expired or library materials have not been returned.

Majors: Declaring

All majors at UMF lead to a BA, BS, or BFA degree.  Students are reminded that the declaration of a major is a serious decision; it involves the assumption of obligations on the student's part--principally the obligation to complete the degree requirements as described in the Catalog in order to receive a degree.  Students may change their major during the junior or senior year; but they must complete all requirements associated with the new major. 

While many students are accepted into a major when they apply to the University of Maine at Farmington (UMF), others do not decide on a major until after they arrive on campus. Students in the Liberal Arts Undecided Program who have completed 64 or more credits must declare a major in order to be allowed to register for courses. New transfers to UMF will be allowed one semester in which to declare a major if they are transferring in 64 or more credits. Students should work with their advisors or the division chair of the program they are entering.

In some instances, students may wish to apply for an individualized major (the BA in Interdisciplinary Studies, Concentration in Individualized Studies), but in all instances this requires a coherent plan of study that includes a minimum of 32 credit hours of remaining coursework.  In very rare circumstances, a student who is close to graduation may apply to complete a Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree. A BGS degree may be awarded when final requirements in the major have not been completed, but the student has earned 128 or more credits and has met all of the general education requirements.  The BGS is only available to students who at the end of the semester of application will be within 16 credit hours of completing all graduation requirements.

Course Overload Privileges

Any student wishing to take an overload beyond 18 credits in a fall or spring semester, or an overload beyond 4 credits during a winter, May or summer session, must get the signed approval of the faculty advisor. To take an overload in a fall or spring semester a student must also be on the Dean’s List for the previous semester for which grades are available at the time of registration; this requirement does not apply to winter, May, and summer sessions. The Dean’s List requirement for overload privileges may be waived by the provost or a designee of the provost. Course overloads are not accepted prior to the start of the semester for the fall and spring semesters, but will be accepted for winter, May and summer sessions.

Courses: Auditing

Any student may audit a course with the approval of the chairperson of the division in which the course is offered, and with the consent of the instructor and the student's faculty advisor. An auditor does not receive University credit and is not permitted to take credit examinations in the audited courses. However, the student pays the full tuition rate for the course. Students may change from auditing a course to taking it for credit or from taking a course for credit to auditing a course only during the schedule-change period and only with the consent of the instructor and the student's faculty advisor.

Class Attendance

The University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) subscribes to the policy that sound scholarship involves attendance at all classes. Students are expected to attend classes and are responsible for all class work whether they are present or absent. Instructors establish their own attendance policies, but they must recognize administrative excuses and must state the class attendance policy in writing before the end of the Add/Drop (schedule change) period. Students are permitted to leave a class meeting without penalty if the instructor does not appear within ten minutes of the scheduled beginning of the class period and has not sent word that he or she will be late or made previous arrangements with the class.

Class Attendance: Excuses

When requested, the Provost will issue administrative excuses for classes missed when students are officially representing the university. All other absences should be handled by the instructor of the course. A student may appeal the instructor's decision to the instructor's division chairperson. Whether excused or not, students are responsible for the work assigned.

Final Examination Policies

Final examinations shall be given only during the final examination period. No final examination scheduled for a group or section during the final examination period shall be changed by an instructor to a different time or place unless approved by the Provost. No examinations except certain lab exams will be given during the week that precedes final exam week.

No student shall be required to take more than two final examinations in one day. Students who are scheduled for more than two examinations in one day shall take the first and the last and shall be entitled to make-up examinations in place of the others. Arrangements for such examinations must be made with the instructor prior to the final exam period.

Final Examinations: Missed Exams

A student who is willfully absent from a final examination in a course shall be denied the privilege of a substitute examination. The course grade shall be determined as though the examination had resulted in a failing grade. If, in the judgment of the Provost, there appears to be just cause for the student's absence from the final examination (including medical reasons), the student may be granted permission for a special examination.

Course Scheduling Policies

A schedule of course offerings is published on MaineStreet prior to the beginning of each semester. It is the responsibility of the student to meet with the faculty advisor to plan an appropriate schedule for the upcoming semester. The prospective academic schedule is developed with the faculty advisor.

Courses: Add / Drop

After the initial course registration period, students may adjust their class schedules by completing a schedule change form and bringing it to the Merrill Center, or they can use MaineStreet. Faculty advisors' signatures are not generally required for schedule changes.

First-year students are required to have faculty advisors' signature for all schedule changes in their first semester.

Course Drop Policy and Process

When a student drops a course, the course is erased from the student's transcript. Charges for courses that are dropped during the first two weeks of a semester will be canceled (please see academic calendar for specific deadline). After the published deadline, no adjustments to charges are generally made.

Late drops are granted infrequently and only during the first half of a semester. The student must demonstrate that there are extenuating circumstances (e.g., serious illness, family tragedy, etc.) and that they are documented.

Requests must be in the form of a typed letter, signed and dated, and must address the following information:

1) What course or courses are involved?

2) What are the circumstances leading to this request?

3) What prevented a timely withdrawal by the university's deadline?

4) Where is the documentation housed, if not appended to the request (e.g., Student Health Center or Center for Human Development)?

Requests are submitted to the Merrill Center.

Program Requirements: Responsibility for

Students are reminded of their responsibility to monitor degree program requirements and to plan their schedule of courses according to the degree program requirements in force at the time of their matriculation into the degree program. They should periodically check with their faculty advisors, particularly when changing schedules. The student alone has sole responsibility for seeing that all graduation requirements are met and is responsible for seeking advice when necessary.

Course Equivalents and Substitutions

The chairperson of the division which houses the course may grant equivalents for certain required courses for students of demonstrated proficiency and may permit the substitution of approved equivalents. A copy of the completed Course Substitution/Equivalency Authorization form will be placed in the student's permanent file.

A student with a disability may request a course substitution if that disability prevents him/her from completing a required course. See Claire Nelson, Coordinator of Academic Services for Students with Disabilities, for specifics about the petition process.

Matriculated students who elect to register for one or more courses at another regionally accredited university must seek approval before hand with their division chairperson if they wish those courses to equate to a major requirement.

Grading

Before the end of the schedule change period, each faculty member must announce in writing the examination and required oral and written work policies of the course as well as the methods used to arrive at final grades.

At the University of Maine at Farmington, the following grades are computed into the grade point average (GPA):

     A - excellent

     B - good

     C - satisfactory

     D - minimal pass

     F - failure

     L - dropout


The following grades are not computed into the GPA:

    W - withdrew

     I - incomplete

     P - pass (C-minus or above)

     LP - low pass (D-plus or below)

     F - fail (in a pass/fail course)

     MG - missing grade

     DG - deferred grade

     T - transfer grade

Grades are recorded in MaineStreet by the faculty at the close of each semester.

Violation of the Code of Academic Integrity may result in a course grade of F that is accompanied by a transcript notation of X (failure due to academic dishonesty).

The Student Academic Progress Report is completed at the discretion of the faculty member in order to advise students of proficiencies and/or deficiencies. It is sent electronically to the student, the student's advisor, and the Merrill Center.

Grade Point Average: How to Compute

In the University of Maine at Farmington's (UMF) grading system, grade points are awarded for letter grades as follows:

A  4.00 points C-  1.67 points
A- 3.67 points D+ 1.33 points
B+ 3.33 points D  1.00 point
B  3.00 points D-  0.67 points
B-  2.67 points F   0.00 points
C+ 2.33 points L  0.00 points
C   2.00 points W  0.00 points

 

Grade point averages are computed electronically. Only final grades which carry numerical grade points are counted in computing the grade point average (GPA). Courses taken pass/fail and courses with grades of incomplete are not counted. Grades and credits for courses transferred to UMF are not included in the calculation of the GPA. (The exception is courses taken through UMF's National Student Exchange and specific Study Abroad programs.) If a course is repeated once, the second grade only is figured into the GPA. In the event that a course is repeated more than once, the second and all subsequent grades are counted.


GPA is the average grade per credit. To find the GPA, multiply the number of credits for each course by the grade points earned in that course, which will show the number of quality points earned. Add the quality points for all courses attempted in a semester and divide that sum by the number of credits attempted that semester in courses that are not pass/fail*.


Example:

Course Grade Credits Grade Points   Quality Points
1 A 4 4.00 = 16.00
2 P (Pass)  4* ------- = --------
3 C 4 2.33 = 9.33
4 F 4 0.00 = 0.00

12 (not including 4 as pass*)                   Total 25.33   
 
GPA = 25.33 quality points divided by 12 credits = 2.11 GPA

 


Thecumulative GPA is figured in the same manner, but it includes all UMF courses taken to date.

Grade Changes

Faculty members have a period of one semester subsequent to the semester in which a grade has originally been issued to change a student's grade at the faculty member's discretion.

Grade Grievances

Under certain limited circumstances, a student may appeal a grade awarded by a faculty member in a course. Because the faculty member who issued the grade is in the best position to evaluate the performance of students enrolled in his or her course, the faculty member's academic judgment and academic evaluation of a student's work shall not be reviewable. However, a student may appeal a grade if he or she can demonstrate compelling evidence that the faculty member has: (1) failed to follow published evaluation criteria for the course; (2) disregarded published academic policy; or (3) used non-academic criteria to evaluate the student's work in an unfair or discriminatory way. A student with a grievance of this sort against a faculty member may appeal by making use of the following procedures:

1. The student shall file a written complaint with the faculty member. The written complaint should be submitted within 90 days of the day the grade is posted, should detail the reason for the appeal and should provide any available supporting evidence. The student should also submit a copy of the complaint to the division chairperson responsible for the faculty member.

2. If the division chairperson does not receive written notification from either the faculty member or the student of resolution of the issue within five academic days, a hearing will be scheduled with those involved. The division chairperson shall provide a written record of the hearing and submit a recommendation in writing to those involved.

3. If, after five academic days following the hearing with the chairperson, the matter remains unresolved, the student, the faculty member, or both may appeal to a Faculty Senate hearing panel. This panel shall consist of three members chosen by lot from the Faculty Senate, excluding members from the same division as the faculty member being grieved.

4. The appeal to the Faculty Senate must be in writing and accompanied by all previous written material concerning the matter.

5. The Senate panel shall call a hearing at which the student and the faculty member will be invited to appear. The division chair may attend at the request of the student, the faculty member or the hearing panel.

6. The Senate panel shall act as arbiter of the grievance before it, and its decision regarding the issue before it shall be binding on all parties to the dispute. The decision of the Senate panel shall be communicated to the student and the faculty member within five days of the hearing.

7. If the Senate panel decides that the student's grade should be changed, the faculty member must change the grade within ten academic days of receiving notification of Senate panel's decision. If, after ten days, the faculty member has not changed the grade and there is no appeal to the VPAA pending, the Senate panel shall refer the matter to the VPAA, who shall change the grade.

8. If either the student or the faculty member wishes to appeal the decision of the Faculty Senate panel, he or she may do so within five academic days of receiving written notification from the panel. To appeal the decision, the student or faculty member must submit a request for appeal to the VPAA. The appeal must be in writing and accompanied by all previous written materials concerning the matter.

9. The decision of the VPAA shall be communicated to the student and the faculty member in writing. This decision shall be final and binding, and all parties shall be required to adhere to it. If the VPAA decides that the grade should be changed, the faculty member must change the grade within five academic days of receiving written notification of the VPAA's decision. If the grade has not been changed after five academic days, the VPAA shall change the grade.

Grading: Pass / Fail Option

Courses which may be taken for a pass/fail rather than a letter grade are noted as P/F Option in the UMF Catalog, subject to the restrictions explained in this section. Only students with junior or senior standing may elect the pass/fail option. They may do so for only one course per semester in addition to any courses which are graded pass/fail for all students.

No more than three courses for pass/fail grades may be taken by a student in the major without the approval of the student's faculty advisor and the division chairperson. Students who have not declared majors are limited to no more than three pass/fail option courses in the discipline represented by the faculty advisor.

A student who chooses to take a course which has the pass/fail option will notify the Merrill Center during the drop period if he or she does not want a letter grade. A student who initially selects the P/F option may switch to the graded option on or before the final day for course withdrawal. Once made, this decision cannot be changed. A-B-C-D-F grades turned in by professors will be converted into pass (A to C-), low pass (D, D, D-), and fail (F) for those students who have made a request to the Merrill Center.

Courses taken for pass/fail credit (except those courses which are graded pass/fail for all students in that course) may not be repeated for pass/fail credit. They may be repeated with the second grade replacing the first, but only for A-B-C-D-F credit. When pass/fail grading is used, no further grades such as honors or high pass or low pass will be given.

Grades: Incompletes

All prescribed course work is expected to be completed during the semester or term in which the course is offered unless the syllabus specifies a longer period of time. If medical or other emergency conditions develop, the instructor may, at his or her discretion, award a grade of Incomplete (I), permitting an extension for a period of up to a full semester to allow the student to complete the course work.

An Incomplete grade is a privilege granted by a faculty member in response to extraordinary circumstances; it should not be seen by students as the normal response to missing work.  Ordinarily, when a student has failed to complete required course work by the end of the semester, the instructor will either report a grade for the course in which the missing work is given a value of zero or, in cases where failure to complete assigned work constitutes failure to meet the minimum requirements of the course, award a grade of F.  The grade of Incomplete shall be awarded only when the following conditions are met:  1) the student has valid reasons for not completing the work; 2) the student has presented these reasons to the instructor; and 3) the missing work constitutes less than one-third of the required work for the course.

When a grade of Incomplete is awarded, the instructor shall specify in writing the work to be completed and the deadline by which it is to be completed, using the appropriate form, with copies to the student and to the Merrill Center.  The instructor is not required to allow the full period (a semester) for the completion of the missing work.  The deadline for the completion of missing work is at the discretion of the instructor, who, however, shall not under any circumstances, allow longer than a semester for the completion of the missing work.

When the missing work is completed, the instructor shall promptly submit a change of grade form to the Merrill Center, changing the Incomplete to the appropriate letter grade.  Since the maximum term for Incomplete grades is one semester, the instructor must submit a change of grade form for each Incomplete on or before the date on which grades are due for the semester following the semester in which the Incomplete was awarded.  The instructor may not continue the Incomplete for a second semester.  Failure to submit a timely change of grade form for an Incomplete shall be treated as equivalent to failing to submit grades for a class and shall be reported to the instructor's division chair.

If a course syllabus specifies that work may extend beyond the semester or term in which the course is offered, students may be assigned a progress grade designated by the letter grade DG, which will remain on the grade record until the final grade is submitted.  All DG grades must be converted to final grades to complete graduation requirements.

Courses: Repeating

Students can receive credit for a course only once.  There are a few exceptions.  Where these exist, they are noted in the official course descriptions.
 
Students are permitted to repeat a course in order to improve a grade.  When a course is repeated once, both grades appear on the transcript.  However, only the second grade is counted in the cumulative GPA.  If a course was initially taken for a grade, it cannot be repeated on a pass-fail basis.
 
When students elect to repeat a course more than once, the second and all subsequent grades are counted in the GPA.  All grades earned in the course will remain on the student's transcript, but credit for the course is awarded only once (based on the final attempt).
 
In the event that a student wishes to repeat a course no longer offered by the University, an equivalent course may be substituted.  Equivalence shall be determined by the Chair of the Academic Division in which the first course was offered. All other policies for course repeats apply.
 
Students who wish to repeat an equivalent of a UMF course at another college or university must seek approval from their academic advisor.  The advisor in all instances will consult with the Chair of the Academic Division in which the first course was offered.  Credits will be transferred in to UMF provided the earned grade in the repeated course is a C- or better. However, the original UMF grade will still count in the student's cumulative GPA and will remain on the transcript.  
 
In instances where a course equivalency has been granted, but the credit value of the replacement course is different from the original course (e.g., a three-credit course allowed to substitute for a four-credit UMF course), UMF will transfer the actual credit value of the repeated course.  Students will still be expected to earn the total number of credit hours required within their program and the total required overall for graduation.  In other words, course substitutions of lesser credit value may mean that students will need to register for additional coursework at UMF.  Students should take this fact into account prior to requesting a course equivalency from another university.

Courses: Withdrawal

After the drop period, a student may withdraw from a course through the 60% point in the course without academic penalty. The student may obtain a course withdrawal form from the Merrill Center. This form must be signed by the instructor. See the Academic Calendar for specific information about withdrawal dates.

A W will be noted on the student's transcript. The W is an official grade notation, however it will not be included in computing the student's grade point average.

Course Withdrawal Policy and Process: After the Semester Deadline

Requests for withdrawal after the semester deadline are only granted when there are special circumstances (e.g., serious illness, family tragedy, etc.) and these are documented.  Requests must be accompanied by documentation. If the documentation lacks specificity or otherwise does not demonstrate clearly the nature of the circumstances, the request will be denied. There are no tuition refunds for course withdrawals.

Before such a withdrawal is initiated, the student should explore with the instructor if an incomplete would be an appropriate solution.

Requests must be in the form of a typed letter, signed and dated, and must address the following information:

  1. What course or courses are involved?
  2. What are the circumstances leading to this request?
  3. What prevented a timely withdrawal by the university's deadline?
  4. Where is the documentation housed, if not appended to the request (e.g., Student Health Center or Center for Human Development)? 

Requests are submitted to the Merrill Center.  The Associate Provost approves or denies the exception and will notify the student, in writing, and copy the Merrill Center and the student's advisor. The provost's decision is final. There is no appeal process. There are no tuition refunds for course withdrawals.

Academic Forgiveness Policy

A matriculated student may request academic forgiveness for one semester after a separation from the University of Maine Farmington (UMF) of at least seven years. Only one semester will be forgiven, and all courses taken that semester will be affected. The academic detail (including grades and attempted credits) will be displayed on the transcript but removed from the cumulative GPA calculation. A notation of the semester forgiven will be made on the transcript. No tuition or fee refunds will be issued. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will render the final decision.

Students requesting academic forgiveness should be aware that the GPA listed on the UMF transcript is Farmington's GPA and not what other institutions will necessarily use in making admissions decisions. For example, medical school admissions offices may calculate the GPA based on all courses taken regardless of the forgiven semester.

Dean's List

The University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) maintains a Dean's List each semester for those students completing a minimum of 12 credits in courses producing quality points. A student whose grade point average equals or exceeds 3.8 will be listed with High Academic Achievement. A student whose grade point average for the semester is less than 3.8 but equal to or greater than 3.5 will be listed with Academic Achievement. All previous incompletes must be completed in a satisfactory manner for a student to be considered for Dean's List status at the end of any given semester.  Academic Achievement awarded at commencement is based on all course work taken at UMF. (See Graduation with Honors section for further information.)

Academic Probation, Suspension, and Dismissal

Academic Probation, Suspension, and Dismissal

Probation and suspension decisions are made at the end of the fall semester and at the end of the spring semester. May term and summer term grades do not change academic standing or probation status until after the following fall semester; winter term grades do not change academic standing or probation status until after the following spring semester.

Academic Probation

When a student's cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 but does not lead to suspension, the student is placed on academic probation. In addition, a student who is referred to the Academic Standards Committee for possible suspension but who is not suspended will be placed on academic probation for the following semester. Finally, a student who is readmitted to UMF following an academic suspension will be placed on probation for his or her first semester of attendance. Students on probation must earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or above and may not take Incomplete grades. They may also be required by the Associate Provost to meet additional conditions for continued enrollment. To be removed from probation, a student must achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above.

Academic Suspension

When a student’s academic performance does not meet certain minimum conditions for continued enrollment, he or she will be reviewed for suspension by the Academic Standards Committee. The Academic Standards Committee will make a recommendation to the Associate Provost about whether to suspend a student in the following circumstances:

  1. The student earns a semester GPA below 1.0 in any given semester (regardless of probation status).
  2. The student receives one or more Incomplete grades while on academic probation.
  3. The student earns a semester GPA below 2.0 while on academic probation.
  4. The student fails to satisfy conditions imposed by the Associate Provost for continued enrollment.

Students being considered for suspension will receive notification by mail and e-mail. Students who do not request a hearing with the Academic Standards Committee will be suspended automatically.  A student who wishes to discuss his or her academic situation with the Academic Standards Committee prior to its recommendation must schedule an appointment for a hearing and submit a formal statement detailing the factors leading to his or her academic difficulties and outlining a specific plan of action to address problem areas. The Academic Standards Committee will make suspension recommendations to the Associate Provost on a case-by-case-basis and may also recommend that students not suspended be required to meet conditions for continued enrollment. In cases where the Academic Standards Committee recommends suspension or conditions for continued enrollment, students may appeal to the Associate Provost.

Readmission and Dismissal

Students who have been suspended ordinarily may not enroll in any UMF courses until they have been readmitted. Normally a student who is suspended may not apply for readmission to UMF for a period of 12 months. A student who is suspended for a second time may not apply for readmission for five years. (For further information, see Readmission Policy in the Admission section of the UMF Catalog.) Students who are suspended for a third time are permanently dismissed from the university and may not apply for readmission.

Student Conduct Code

The University of Maine at Farmington has a code to regulate conduct on campus. The code provides for dismissal, suspension, disciplinary probation, and official censure. Faculty members and students should consult the Student Handbook, available on myCampus under Forms and Documents.

Copyright Policy

The University of Maine at Farmington's official policy is to abide by the copyright laws of the United States while exercising fair use rights to their fullest extent.

Graduation Requirements

Residency Requirement

All students in baccalaureate degree programs must earn a minimum of 20 credits in their major from UMF, and earn either their final 32 credits or 48 of their final 64 credits from UMF. This requirement may be waived under special circumstances by the provost or a designee of the provost. Courses taken from another institution as part of the National Student Exchange or approved study abroad programs are counted toward the residency requirement.

This policy applies to all transfer students, including those transferring from within the UMS.

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Completion of at least 128 credits and other requirements of the specific program (see descriptions of each major), with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

Completion of at least 128 credits and other requirements for specific program, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.

Bachelor of General Studies: Education Studies (B.G.S.)

Completion of a minimum of 128 credits and other requirements specific to the program, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5. This degree is designed for students previously enrolled in one of UMF's teacher education programs who realize that they no longer wish to pursue teacher certification. Students will complete extensive coursework in education, as well as in an additional discipline outside education. Students interested in pursuing this degree should contact Kathy Yardley, Associate Provost and Dean of Education.

Uncompleted Work

All uncompleted course work must be finished before a student may graduate. No student may graduate with grades of I, DG, or MG on the transcript.

Majors: Dual Major Policy

Some students may wish to have a dual or double major.  This is permitted, but typically requires advanced planning and careful work with academic advisors in both disciplines.  Some combinations can be completed in a four-year time frame.  Others may take longer.

In instances where the two majors lead to different degrees (for example, a B.A. and a B.S.), the student must declare a primary program.  Only one degree will be awarded (a B.A. or a B.S.), and this will be determined by the primary program, although both majors will be recognized at commencement and on the student's transcript.

The declaration of a primary program must be made at the time the student is admitted to the second major.  This can be accomplished by submitting a Change of Major form in the Merrill Center. 

All students with double majors must meet all the requirements for both majors (including, for example, concentration requirements, supporting coursework, and minimum grade point average) in order to be awarded both degrees and have both listed on their final transcript.

Students who wish to receive two separate degrees (as opposed to a dual major leading to a single degree) should consult the policy on Second Degrees.

Degrees: Second Degrees

Students who wish to earn a second baccalaureate degree must complete a minimum of thirty-two credits in addition to those required by the first degree.  Students must meet all requirements for the second degree (including, for example, concentration requirements, supporting coursework, minimum grade point average).

Graduation With Honors

At graduation, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 or above will be recognized as summa cum laude; a student with a 3.7 to 3.89 GPA will be recognized as magna cum laude; and a student with a 3.5 to 3.69 GPA will be recognized as cum laude. Graduation honors are based on the eighth semester (or last semester). Graduation honors listed in the commencement program are tentative, based on the GPA after the seventh semester (or next to last semester). Because semester grades are not calculated until after the commencement ceremony, students may lose their honors status after graduation if they have not maintained the necessary cumulative GPA.

Graduation: Application for Degree

In keeping with long-standing academic tradition, the University of Maine at Farmington holds only one commencement each year, at the end of the spring semester.

Students will be eligible to march in the May commencement if they:

1) will have completed (assuming satisfactory performance in spring semester courses) all degree requirements, OR

2) at the time of commencement have only two or three courses remaining AND a reasonable plan approved by advisor and the Associate Provost to complete these courses over the May and Summer terms,

OR

3) at the time of commencement have only a required internship remaining (including student teaching) that has already been scheduled for summer or is only possible the following fall.

Students who fall into a combination of category 2 and category 3 who wish to march at commencement may request, in writing, permission from the dean.

Students completing degree requirements at the end of fall semester (December graduates) are eligible to march in commencement held the following May as a matter of course.

All students who wish to participate in commencement must file an Application for Degree form with the Merrill Center by October 1st preceding the May of commencement.

At least once a semester, students should review degree requirements and their progress toward a degree with their academic advisor. Remaining requirements should be identified and mapped out. While this "map to graduation" can remain somewhat flexible for a time, it needs to be fully settled and discussed with an academic advisor no later than the point at which a student has reached 96 completed credits (i.e. prior to the final year of full-time study or its equivalent).

Withdrawal from the University

Students who decide to withdraw from the University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) must obtain a withdrawal form from the Merrill Center and follow the required procedures.

The grading policy applying to students withdrawing from UMF is the same as the policy applying to students withdrawing from an individual course. Thus, students who withdraw from the University after the last date to withdraw from a course will usually receive failing grades in all courses in which they are enrolled.

Exceptions to this policy are sometimes granted in cases of illness or other extenuating circumstances. Withdrawal from the university does not necessarily prevent a student's being placed on academic probation or being academically suspended.

Re-entry to the University

Students who have been separated from the university for a continuous period of 2 or more years will be held to the catalog requirements of their year of reentry. Students who reenter after a separation of less than 2 years may choose if they would prefer to reenter under the catalog of their original year of matriculation or the catalogue of their reentry year.

When a student seeks to re-enter the University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) after a period of absence of more than two years, readmission into her/his former major is not automatic. Approval must be obtained from the division chair. Courses that are more than seven years old are not automatically applied to the major; rather, a course-by-course analysis will be made by the division to determine whether the course content is still appropriate to meet program requirements.

Students who have withdrawn from UMF or who have been suspended and who wish to seek reentry should consult the Merrill Center for advice on the procedure to be followed.

Individualized Study Arrangements

Students may, during their career at the University of Maine at Farmington, pursue independent study on or off-campus or attend classes or participate in a special work experience during a period other than the normal semester sequence. Such individualized arrangements to meet graduation requirements in certain major areas must be made with the approval of appropriate university officials.

Academic Exceptions

Course/program Requirements

Requests for academic exceptions from course or program requirements should be submitted to the Division Chair of the division responsible for the course or program. Requests should be in the form of a typed letter. They must include a detailed explanation and be signed. The division chair will attach his/her recommendation to the student's request and forward it to the Associate Provost. If the provost does not agree with the recommendation, he/she will consult with the division chair before rendering a decision. The provost approves or denies the exception and will notify the student, in writing, and copy the Merrill Center and the student's advisor. The provost's decision is final. There is no appeal process.

General Education Requirements

Requests for academic exceptions from distribution requirements in humanities, fine arts, natural sciences, social sciences, and mathematics are routed through the appropriate division. Requests should be in the form of a typed letter. They must include a detailed explanation and be signed. The division chair will attach his/her recommendation to the student's request and forward it to the Associate Provost. If the provost does not agree with the recommendation, he/she will consult with the division chair before rendering a decision. The provost approves or denies the exception and will notify the student, in writing, and copy the Merrill Center and the student's advisor. The provost's decision is final. There is no appeal process.

University Requirements

Requests for exceptions to University requirements, such as minimum graduation GPA, residency requirements, total credits for graduation, pass/fail options, etc., are submitted to the Associate Provost. Requests should be in the form of a typed letter, including detailed information, and be signed. The provost approves or denies the exception and will notify the student, in writing, and copy the Merrill Center and the student's advisor. The provost's decision is final. There is no appeal process.

Physical Activity Waivers and Equivalencies

Physical Activity Waivers

Transfer/Equivalency Credit
  • An official copy of the student’s transcript and course description must be to the Merrill Center for a formal review.
  • If the student has taken an Activity Course at a previous post-secondary institution and the Transfer Officer warrants that the previous class is comparable to PHE then the student will receive a transfer credit (Note: the course must have involved regular physical activity).
  • Previous participation in Varsity, Club, and/or Intramural sports does not count as an equivalent to PHE, nor do individual activities such as hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, orienteering, etc.
  • On rare occasion, a stand-alone program that does not come through as a transfer credit might be considered for equivalency credit, upon written request/appeal, such as National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS).  Submit a course equivalency/course replacement form to the Merrill Center for consideration.  Equivalency determined by the transfer officer.
 
Military Experience
  • Most United States Military personnel undergo rigorous physical training (PT) during Basic Training/Boot Camp. Therefore, veteran students who have completed Basic Training/Boot Camp will receive transfer credit for PHE
  • The student’s DD214 documentation (all discharged military personnel receive this upon separation) will verify completion of this training.
  • The DD214 must be submitted to the Merrill Center for the equivalency credit to be granted.
 
Off-Campus Early Childhood Education Cohorts:
  • This program is offered as an off-campus/non-residential extension program to meet the needs of primarily non-traditional students. – (The program is currently offered at Waterville/Fairfield or Bath/Brunswick locations.)
  • Faculty Senate voted 11-0-0 on September 8, 2009 to approve permanent waiver of PHE 010 requirement for off-campus Early Childhood Education cohorts.
  • The degree audit will clearly state that this requirement has been waived.
 
Medical
  • All reasonable accommodations will be provided to facilitate participation in the PHE program
  • On a rare occasion a student may have a medical condition precluding them from participating in a physical activity
  • The student’s request for medical waiver must go through the UMF Health Center for final determination.
 
PHE & Varsity Student-Athletes
Student-athletes are encouraged to take PHE in their “off” season and/or semester that is least affected, but still within their first two semesters For example, if someone plays soccer in the fall they should take PHE in the spring. If a student participates in a sport like basketball that occupies both semesters, they should take PHE in the fall because it is the least affected semester. Varsity student-athletes have the option of taking the Varsity Athlete Lab which is only offered in the spring (if applicable). This is geared specifically for aspiring student-athletes interested in the challenge and opportunity to train across five biomotor areas critical for their improved development and performance. However, student-athletes are not required to take this section and may choose to take any of the other PHE classes: Strength & Conditioning, Cardio, Aquatics, or PlayFit (RecFit is also an option, but is only offered in the fall).

Full and Part-time Student Status

Full-time and part-time status is defined differently for different purposes.  
  • For financial aid purposes, eligibility rules and levels of aid vary for different types of financial aid, and thus students must always consult with the Financial Aid Office in the Merrill Center regarding any questions concerning impact of course load on scholarships, grants, loans, loan repayment, loan deferment, student employment and other aid-related matters.  Federal student aid regulations specify a minimum standard for full-time enrollment status for undergraduate students at 12 credits per semester (including the combined May/Summer term).
  • For academic purposes, the minimum credit load required to be considered a full-time student in a fall or spring semester is 12 credit hours; the minimum credit load required to be considered a full-time student in winter, May, or summer sessions is 4 credit hours.
     
  • Varsity athletics and some club sports require a minimum of full-time enrollment (among other criteria) in the semester of participation to maintain eligibility to participate. This does not apply to winter or May term enrollment for those participating in fall or spring sports whose season extends into January or May.
     
  • There is no minimum number of credits needed for matriculated students to live in the residence halls.
     
Developmental courses (LIA 102, MAT 010/011/012 and Bridge courses) count towards the minimum credit load.

Students wishing to graduate in four years must earn an average of 16 credits per semester for 8 semesters in order to accumulate the 128 credits required for graduation unless they take courses in winter, May or summer sessions to compensate for averaging fewer than 16 credits per semester.

Student Writing

Student Writing

The University of Maine at Farmington (UMF) strongly values the importance of students developing effective writing skills as part of a liberal arts education. In formal writing assignments, students are held to a high standard for clarity, coherence, and organization as well as for adherence to appropriate conventions of grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

Credit Hour: Definition

Definition of the Credit Hour

In all of its courses and programs, the University of Maine at Farmington defines a credit hour as an amount of work that reasonably approximates one hour of classroom instruction supplemented by a minimum of two additional hours of student out-of class work each week for a full fourteen-week semester. Accordingly, in all lecture or seminar courses, it is our expectation that students will work on course assignments for a minimum of two hours outside of class for every hour they are in class.

It is understood that internships, practica, student teaching, studio work, laboratory work, online courses, travel courses, May, summer, winter terms and other academic activities leading to the award of credit will organize student work in configurations which do not precisely match this definition. Nevertheless, the amount of student work required per credit hour in these courses or credit-bearing activities at UMF will reasonably approximate the amount of work required per credit hour in a standard lecture or seminar course, as above.

See other years' Catalogs