University of Maine at Farmington 2018-2019 Catalog

 
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Environmental Science
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  ENV 110N - Introductory Environmental Science

An introduction to the content, methods, and philosophy of science with an emphasis on the principles of environmental science and their application to topics in research or current issues in science. Each instructor will focus on a specific area of environmental science to allow more in-depth study of a particular sub-discipline or interdisciplinary topic. Topics of focus may include such areas as Lessons from the Wild, Understanding the Ecological Footprint, or Recognition of Gaia (students should check course listings for current offerings). Cannot be used as elective credit towards the Environmental Science Major. This course may be repeated for General Elective credit when the topic differs. Every semester.



Credit: 4

  ENV 130N - Tropical Nature: Exploring Costa Rica

For two weeks, we will explore the astonishing diversity of many of Costa Rica's ecosystems, including rain forests, cloud forests, mangrove swamps, and beach ecosystems.  The course will emphasize natural history, field studies of ecological patterns, tropical conservation, and reflecting on and writing about your experiences. Cross-listed with BIO 130N. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Pass/Fail only. Winter term, in odd years.



Credit: 4

  ENV 257 - Soil Science

Study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. The influence of these properties on soil quality, use, and management will be examined as well as their role in soil classification. The importance of soils as a determinant of environmental quality and modern approaches to soil conservation will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): One 100-level geology course and CHY 142. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  ENV 277 - Special Topics

Covers specialized topics not covered in the environmental science curriculum.  May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite(s): Determined by topic. Varies.



Credit: 2-4

  ENV 294 - Forest Ecology and Conservation

A study of the ecology, management, and conservation of forest ecosystems. Focus on ecological principles and their application to sustaining biological diversity in exploited and protected forests in the face of rapid environmental change. Field work and examples will emphasize Maine forests. Winter field trips, writing, oral presentations, and group and independent inquiry are required. Overnight weekend trip possible. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160 and BIO 170 or permission of instructor. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  ENV 321 - Tropical Island Ecology

This course provides experiential learning of the biotic and abiotic factors that govern tropical island ecosystems (coral reefs, grass beds, mangroves, dry Antillean scrub and moist mature forests) found on a typical Caribbean tropical island (St. John, USVI). Concepts addressed include: biodiversity, adaptation and co-evolution, and energy flow in these systems. All students will participate in a collaborative research project with island fauna and daily lessons on island ecology. Students will also learn about the cultural history of the West Indies and contemporary human-caused environmental problems associated with island development. Intensive field work includes daily snorkeling and strenuous hiking to field locations. Assessments will include a field journal, pre- and post-course examinations covering course text (and ancillary text), on-site lessons, and assigned technical papers, and the submission of a formal technical manuscript describing the results of field research. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160, BIO 170, and permission of instructor. May Term or Winter Term. Every year.



Credit: 4

  ENV 353 - Conservation Biology

Designed to examine the nature and global patterns of biological diversity, the complex factors that have resulted in recent losses in diversity and ecosystem decay related to habitat degradation, over exploitation, and global climate change, and the ecological ramifications of this most devastating event in the existence of the human species. Lectures, presentations by professionals in other fields, readings, discussion sessions, and student participation in regional conservation efforts will all be used to encourage critical thinking about biodiversity issues and provide students with hands on applications in the science of conservation biology. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160 and BIO 170. Every three years.



Credit: 4

  ENV 361 - Ecology

The interrelationships of living organisms with biotic and abiotic environment considered from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include the limiting influence of the physical environment on species distributions, the roles of competition, predation, and parasitism in shaping the composition of biological communities, direct and indirect species interactions, energy flow, the importance of scale in terms of understanding ecological processes, and the impact of anthropogenic factors such as overexploitation, invasive species, and global climate change on ecological systems. Emphasis is placed on scientific inquiry and critical consideration of ecological processes. Three hours of lectures, one three-hour in-class lab, at least three hours of additional lab work per week, and significant time investment in statistical analysis, graphics, computer modeling, and report preparation. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160 and BIO 170 and junior or senior standing. Every year.



Credit: 4

  ENV 377 - Special Topics

Designed to cover topics that would not normally be covered in the environmental science curriculum. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160/170; CHY 141/142; GEY 101N. Varies.



Credit: 2-4

  ENV 383 - Aquatic Ecology

Study of freshwater lakes and streams emphasizing the interrelationships of biological, chemical, and physical factors. Includes practical experience in taking and evaluating samples from aquatic environments. Prerequisite(s): BIO 160 and BIO 170. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  ENV 390 - Environmental Science Internship

Experiential learning situation where the student can earn credit for appropriate activities. The experience should involve the gathering and manipulation of environmental data. Proposals should be developed in conjunction with environmental science faculty member and must be approved by the program faculty. Prerequisite(s): Environmental science majors with at least 16 program credits or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail only) Every semester.



Credit: 4-16

  ENV 397 - Independent Study in Environmental Science

An opportunity for students majoring in environmental science to initiate and conduct an environmental study in accordance with scientific procedures under the supervision of an appropriate staff member. Prerequisite(s): Junior and senior environmental science majors or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Varies.



Credit: 2-4

  ENV 477 - Special Topics

The study of a specialized topic not offered in the usual curriculum. Varies. 



Credit: 2-4

  ENV 497 - Independent Study in Environmental Science

An opportunity for students majoring in environmental science to initiate and conduct an environmental study in accordance with scientific procedures under the supervision of an appropriate staff member. Prerequisite(s): Junior and senior environmental science majors or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Varies. 



Credit: 2-4

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