University of Maine at Farmington 2020-2021 Catalog

 
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Geography
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  GEO 103S - Peoples and Environments

Study of the human activities that occur in places. Emphasis on the spatial organization of cultural, economic, political, and demographic processes of the human landscape. (Pass/Fail option) Every semester.



Credit: 4

  GEO 104S - Global Transformations

An introduction to debate over globalization examining the geographical dimensions of intensifying global connections. Addresses both the pros and cons of cultural, economic, political, and environmental change due to market liberalization, job outsourcing, global governance, global cultural flows, new social movements and climate change. (Pass/Fail option) Every semester.



Credit: 4

  GEO 105S - Earth, Wind and Fire: The Geography of Natural Hazards

People value landscapes. We imbue landscapes with meaning through the values we place onto the cultural and natural features that make up landscapes. This simple concept gets to the heart of Geography and Environmental Planning. The course provides a blended natural and social approach to understanding landscapes, how they form, and how they change, the risks and hazards that these landscapes produce, and how human societies adapt to those risks and hazards. This course explores four factors central to the formation and alteration of landscapes:

  • Geomorphology and the underlying physical processes of landscape change, including risks and hazards such as earthquakes, volcanism, flooding, and erosion

  • Biogeography and factors that influence the distribution of species, communities, and biomes, as well as the weather and climate typical of particular landscapes

  • Disturbances that reconfigure and alter the ecology found on landscapes, and that create risks and hazards such as wildfire, hurricanes, tornados, drought, and biological invasions

  • Human impacts on landscapes, including human-environment interactions, and the ways in which people deal with the diverse risks and hazards they encounter in their landscapes.



Credit: 4

  GEO 131S - Conservation and Environment

This class examines the ideas, institutions and regulatory frameworks for protecting environments, as well as the underlying theories of natural systems that inform environmental policy. We use the tools of social science to examine contemporary conservation and environmental controversies in depth, paying close attention to issues such as environmental justice, the role of civil society organizations and citizen participation, alternatives to regulation, and the relationship between consumption and environmental degradation. Cross-listed with EPP 131S. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. (Pass/Fail option) Every year.



Credit: 4

  GEO 200S - Geographical Imaginations

This course provides an introduction to the ways that space and place have been imagined in art, philosophy, poetry, film, popular culture, environmental thought and geographic scholarship. We explore various methods of geographic inquiry and explanation in the process of investigating the key thinkers, practitioners and problems in geographic thought. The goal of the course is to prepare students for conducting innovative and exciting research. Every year.



Credit: 4

  GEO 204 - Introduction to GIS

This class introduces students to the recent revolution in geospatial information and technology. The course examines core concepts of spatial thinking, cartography, including the historical and ethical implications of this rapidly changing field. This is the first lab-based course in a sequence which enables students to learn the basic operation of a range of geospatial technology including Google Earth, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and apply their knowledge to an independent research project. Cross-listed with EPP 204. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every year.



Credit: 4

  GEO 207 - Environmental Field Methods

This course introduces the fundamentals of fieldwork-based geographical research methods and scientific report writing. The class focuses on concepts, techniques and tools pertinent to physical and environmental geography and related fields. Students will develop a toolkit of basic skills for fieldwork, data analysis and interpretation, data visualization, and presentation of results through oral, poster, and digital media. Along with a class project, students will work on group project resulting in a final report and presentation based on fieldwork and data you have collected. Cross-listed with EPP 207. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every Fall.



Credit: 4

  GEO 212S - Latin America: Peoples & Environments

This course introduces students to the human activities, environments, and characteristics of place in Latin America. Students will learn how Latin American landscapes and livelihoods have been constructed and are continually re-interpreted, through the study of culture spheres, landforms and climates, ecosystems, pre-Columbian groups, colonial histories, population patterns, social change, economic and political systems, and tourism; some of these themes will be addressed in film or literature. Attention will also be given to the important ways in which Latin American peoples and livelihoods connect with the United States and Maine. Every three years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 214S - Asia: Peoples & Environments

This course introduces students to the human activities, environments, and characteristics of place in Asia. Students will learn how Asian landscapes and livelihoods have been constructed and are continually re-interpreted, through the study of culture spheres, landforms and climates, ecosystems, indigenous groups, colonial histories, population patterns, religious practices, economic and political systems, and tourism; some of these themes will be addressed through film or literature. Attention will also be given to the important ways in which Asian peoples and livelihoods connect with the United States and Maine. Every three years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 219S - Geography of Maine

This course is an introduction to the physical, cultural and economic patterns of Maine. The notions of place and identity are explored. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 231S - Environmental Issues

This course will examine the ethical, economic and cultural context of environmental issues from a geographic perspective. Case studies of policy and planning successes and failures will be used to understand the perspective of decision makers and stakeholders. Cross-listed with EPP 231S. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 235 - Physical Geography

This course studies the forms and processes of the physical environment.  Landscapes, climate, soils and vegetation are studied in their natural and human modified contexts with emphasis on spatial distribution.Cross-listed with EPP 235. Students may receive credit for only one of the course. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 238S - Forest Management: Science, Institutions, and Communities

Forested ecosystems exist under a range of administrative, economic, legal, and social contexts. Forest management is often directed at non-timber and non-forest resources, including aesthetics, water and air quality, wildlife, and more. This course focuses on the social and scientific rationales of forest management, and the divergent outcomes in various social contexts and ecological settings. Field work, site visits, and case study examples will emphasize Maine forests and management strategies. Field trips, writing, oral presentations, and group and independent inquiry are required. Cross-listed with EPP 238S. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every Fall.



Credit: 4

  GEO 244S - Mobile Mapping and GIS

Web mapping, GPS-based navigation apps, and location-based services on our phones have quickly brought digital mapping technologies into our everyday lives. These technologies allow our online and real-world behaviors to be tracked and analyzed in new ways but they also give us access to powerful mobile mapping tools. In this class we will investigate how mobile mapping technologies are used to address a variety of societal problems, such as the response to natural disasters, tracking the spread of deadly diseases, and understanding climate change impacts. We will learn how to use mobile and web-based geographic information systems (GIS) to gather our own data and use that data to solve real-world problems. Cross-listed with EPP 244S. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Offered every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 265S - Climate Change and Society

This course examines how climate change has impacted society across time and space. Using a range of archaeological, historical and contemporary case studies, this course explores how climate change has served as an inhibitor (stressor) and stimulator (opportunity) in societal and cultural development in a range of different contexts (e.g., subsistence, economics, migration). The course examines important concepts of climate change (e.g., vulnerability, resilience, mitigation and adaptation), explores the myriad of human responses to climate change and concludes with an assessment of impacts of climate change in the state of Maine. Cross-listed with ANT 265S. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses.  Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 277 - Topics in Geography

The study of a special topic in geography not offered in the regular geography curriculum. Prerequisite(s): Introductory level geography course or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Varies.



Credit: 4

  GEO 304 - Environmental GIS

This course addresses the interpretation and understanding of data and mapping. It is the second in a sequence of geographic information systems (GIS) courses leading to deeper learning and GIS certification. In classroom, lab and field settings, the course introduces fundamental concepts such as primary GIS data acquisition, database creation, data management, quantitative and qualitative techniques for classification, integration, and management of geographical data. The thematic focus of the course is environmental applications common to practitioners in planning, public health, wildlife, energy, recreation and allied career fields. Cross-listed with EPP 304. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every year.



Credit: 4

  GEO 310 - Sustainable Development

This course focuses on environmentally sustainable development in the developing world. Emphasis is given to productive ways of conceptualizing development initiatives that address environmental integrity, education, health and gender-based development. Critiques of western-led development programs to date are also examined. Data-driven exercises and critical analysis and discussion of course reading materials further an understanding of the complexities associated with sustainable development. Cross-listed with EPP 310. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 320 - Environment, Economy, Society

This course introduces students to the ways that economies are envisioned and managed in the context of environmental impacts and social processes. Attention is devoted to the competing visions and tensions that may arise from economic activities, with investigation of these dynamics at local and global scales. Coursework includes analysis of several economic-environmental case studies and related exercises. Cross-listed with EPP 320. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 325 - Geography of Health and Disease

Health and illness occur within a cultural, economic and regional framework. This course uses geographic theories, methods and models, and epidemiological techniques to investigate patterns of health, illness, and health care delivery. Local case studies as well as international examples are used. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing, one geography or science course or permission of instructor. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 331 - Nature and Society

This course examines the relationships between nature and society from a geographic perspective. Case studies of the factors mediating human/environmental relationships illustrate the theoretical and empirical problems confronting humans in their decisions regarding resource use and management. Prerequisite(s): GEO 231S, or permission of the instructor. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 334 - Political Ecology

This course examines the diverse perceptions, agendas and decision-making associated with conditions of environmental degradation and management. States, commercial interests, citizens and advocacy groups will be evaluated as key actors in processes of environmental discourse and policy. Notions of poverty, power and environmental justice will also be considered. Emphasis on international case studies and the influence of spatial factors in environmental stewardship. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 337 - Environmental Regulations

This course examines the role of the local, state and federal governments in the regulation of economic and developmental activities. Students explore the economic impact of these regulations and the suitability to specific environments. Prerequisite(s): One geography or science course or permission of instructor. Every year.



Credit: 4

  GEO 340 - Sustainable Land Use

This course centers on sustainable design of urban and rural landscapes, investigating local and regional case studies of the connections between built environment and ecological systems. Students use geospatial technologies and environmental planning approaches to assess multiple factors (e.g., soils, transportation, wildlife, scenic values, infrastructure, cultural resources) that influence site planning in the context of present-day property law and environmental regulation. Cross-listed with EPP 340. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 343 - Community Planning

Community planning focuses on how people work together to improve their communities in terms of access to housing, transportation, food and agriculture, social services, economic opportunity and environmental sustainability. This course explores community planning theory and practice, including the history of professional planning, the comprehensive plan, public participation, redevelopment, and the regulatory process. This class has a major project component involving hands-on exploration of innovative planning tools. Cross-listed with EPP 343. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every two years.



Credit: 4

  GEO 377 - Topics in Geography

The study of a specialized topic not offered in the usual curriculum. Varies. 



Credit: 2-4

  GEO 396 - Internship in Geography or GIS

The internship is an essential piece of a student's development towards becoming a professional in geography or Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It consists of a hands-on learning experience based on the student's placement with a sponsor organization, as well as reflective work overseen by the faculty supervisor supporting the internship. Internships must be approved by the faculty supervisor as well as the sponsor organization prior to registration. Every semester. Permission of Instructor.



Credit: 1-16

  GEO 397 - Independent Study in Geography

An opportunity to pursue independent research into selected geographic problems under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): Permission of division. (Pass/Fail option) Varies.



Credit: 4

  GEO 450 - Research in Geography

A course designed to be the capstone experience for students with a geography major or emphasis. The course concentrates on research design, field research and data collection, analysis and presentation of data for a topic in geography, and writing up finding in the form of a lengthy research paper. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing. Cross-listed with EPP 450. Students may receive credit for only one of the courses. Every year.



Credit: 4

  GEO 477 - Topics in Geography

The study of a specialized topic not offered in the usual curriculum. Varies. 



Credit: 2-4

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