University of Maine at Farmington 2020-2021 Catalog

 
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  HTY 103S - United States History I

Survey of the political, social, and economic history of the United States from pre-contact to the end of the Civil War. Every fall.



Credit: 4

  HTY 104S - United States History II

Survey of the political, social, and economic history of the United States from the end of Civil War to the present. Every spring.



Credit: 4

  HTY 110S - Global History I

Surveys fundamental economic, social, political, and cultural developments found throughout the globe from the beginnings of human civilizations to the fifteenth century CE. Topics include early agricultural societies, the rise of cities, how patriarchal societies arose, how humans solved the problem of managing resources and organizing themselves, and how they made sense of mystery. Every fall.



Credit: 4

  HTY 111S - Global History II

Surveys fundamental economic, social, political, and cultural developments found throughout the globe from the fourteenth century CE to the present. Class will begin in the aftermath of the Black Death and the fall of Mongol rule and examine the impact of those events on global developments, especially European and Ottoman expansion and intensified globalization. Other topics: Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, colonization and decolonization of Africa and the Middle East, industrialization, and twentieth-century conflicts. Every other year.



Credit: 4

  HTY 200 - Approaches to History

HTY 200 will introduce the student to the dynamics of the discipline of history scholarship. Topics will include an overview of subfields in the discipline and analysis of the key components of historical literature, i.e., thesis, theory, methodology, and sources. Students will learn to read critically and develop their writing skills, stressing analysis and argumentation. Topics will be selected by the instructor. Required of all history majors and minors. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Every semester. METHODS AND RESEARCH CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 204S - Introduction to Caribbean History

This course provides a historical survey of the islands and peoples of the Caribbean basin and covers the period from the mid-fifteenth century to the late-twentieth century. Major themes will include European conquest and colonialism, the rise and fall of African enslavement, piracy, the development of multi-ethnic societies, anticolonial movements, and the rise of tourism in recent Caribbean history. In so doing, this course identifies the forces that formed the particular history of Caribbean, but it also illustrates the key role that the Caribbean played in the history of America and Europe. Pre-requisites: None. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 209S - History of Slavery in America

This course covers the origins and evolution of modern slavery systems in the Atlantic World encompassing Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course will begin with an exploration of the historical precedents and practices of slavery in ancient and medieval societies, then will turn to the dynamics of its evolution into modern plantation slave systems in the Caribbean, South America, and North America using a comparative approach.  Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 212S - Renaissance and Reformation

Major political, economic, cultural, and religious developments in Western European history from about 1400 to 1650. Course will also consider the global context in which these developments occurred, how they impacted people from different walks of life, and scholars’ debates about how best to describe and characterize this period. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 213S - Medieval Europe

Begins with the breakdown of the Roman imperial world and covers European history into the fifteenth century, with a focus on Western Europe. Topics include the Germanic kingdoms, Christianization of Europe, Carolingians, rise of cities and commerce, conflicts between secular and ecclesiastical rulers, the Crusades, the Black Death, and European expansion. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 214S - Spain from 1000-1700

This course begins with the Umayyad Caliphate ruling most of the Iberian peninsula and proceeds through the gradual expansion of the Christian kingdoms and a reversal of the balance of power. Issues we will explore from this period include the interactions among Christians, Jews, and Muslims within these kingdoms, the role of towns, and the formation of monarchies, and Spain's interaction with its colonies. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 220S - Women & Gender in Premodern Europe

Course will examine the experiences of European women from the Roman period into the sixteenth century and consider how studying these periods through this lens alters our view of the times. In addition to a variety of primary sources, students will study scholarship on such topics as agency and gender. Pre-requisites: None. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 224S - Cultural History of Spain

Students in this course will analyze literature, art and architecture, and culinary traditions of Spain as evidence of the historical interactions among the country's various ethnic and religious groups and of the resulting social structures. This is a travel course in which students will visit relevant museums and historical sites. Every two years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 230S - Colonial America

This course examines the emergence of Colonial America, with the founding of the Jamestown colony in 1607, to the eve of the Revolutionary crisis in 1763. During the semester students will explore the creation of viable political, social, economic structures, emphasizing the transition of colonial North America from a series of isolated colonial outposts to imperial provinces. Topics to be considered include: community and family relations, colonial religious patterns; slavery and race relations; and internal and external tensions. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 231S - Revolutionary America

This course, in the broadest sense, covers the history of America from the Revolution to the rise of the Jeffersonians, 1763-1800. During the course of the semester students will explore the origins, meaning and consequences of the Colonial America's Revolution, looking at how the Colonies' struggle for independence from England affected American society, politics, culture and economics, eventually giving shape to the United States. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 232S - Civil War and Reconstruction

This course examines the circumstances leading up to the American Civil War, the war itself, and the era of Reconstruction. The political, economic, social and cultural factors will be given careful consideration, along with military developments. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 233S - America's Age of Expansion, 1783-1848

From the first days of the Early Republic through the Mexican War, America grew exponentially in terms of territory, population, industry, and culture, a process that literally and figuratively transformed the nation and its people. The central themes of the course include: the displacement of native peoples; the rise of the Cotton Kingdom; the first industrial revolution; the ideologies of politics, race, gender; the technologies of power and production; and demographic and economic transformation. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 234S - American Presidents

This class will explore the American presidency both institutionally and as it was experienced by the men who held the position. It draws on the fields of political, social, cultural and economic history to understand both how the presidency evolved and how those who served understood their role, envisioned their nation, and performed in office. (Pass/Fail option) Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 238S - America Since 1945

This course is to explore some of the major political, social, cultural and economic themes that have dominated America in the decades following World War II. In the course of the semester students will examine a variety of the leading individuals and events that contributed to America's development since 1945 and helped shape present day society. Among the topics to be discussed include: the Cold War, liberal reform movements from the Fair Deal to the Great Society; various reform and protest movements - Civil Rights, the New Left, Women's Rights, Environmental movement; the New Conservatism; and foreign policy in the post-Cold War Era. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 240S - Maine History

Social, economic, cultural and political history of Maine from pre-contact to the present, with an emphasis on the various peoples who have inhabited the state, including Native-Americans and those of French ancestry as well as other ethnic and racial groups. Maine's connection to larger historical events and trends as well as its uniqueness are also key components of this course. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 242S - The Great Depression and New Deal

This course examines American life, politics, and culture in one of the most tumultuous eras in American history: the Great Depression. Students will examine the changing nature of American life, the challenges resulting from the economic collapse and responses of the general population and the government. (Pass/Fail option) Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 246S - US Women's History

This is a survey of U.S. history that considers political, social, economic, and cultural issues with respect to women. Major themes include: the various movements for women's rights; the role of women in the work force; differences among women in class, race, and ethnicity; women's roles in family and community life; and the changing definitions of gender over time. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 247S - History of Canada

This course surveys Canadian history from pre-contact to the present, exploring events, themes and processes that have shaped this nation and its peoples. With an emphasis on specific societies and their interactions and their contributions, the course will analyze political, social, economic and cultural events. Of special importance is the impact of racial, ethnic, gender, and language differences, as well as Canada's historical relationship with the United States. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 251S - American Legal History

This course is designed as an introduction to American legal history from colonial times to end of the nineteenth century. Balancing primary and secondary sources, we will examine developments in legal and constitutional ideology, the formation and adaptation of specific legal institutions, and the law’s role in regulating economic life and social relations. We will be anchoring our analyses of the law’s history in the larger social and economic contexts of American history. As we do so, we will attempt to understand both the complex relationship between law and society and the ways that this relationship changes over time. Pre-requisites: None. Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 253S - Muslim World to 1600

Introduction to the history of Muslim lands from the rise of Islam in the early seventh century to the peak of Ottoman power in the sixteenth century. Closer attention paid to the Mediterranean region than to areas further east. Issues explored will include the rise of Islam, political units and disputes about political legitimacy, cultural and scientific achievements, and the significance of the Muslim world, especially the Ottomans, in the development of the early modern global order. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 255S - History of Children in America

This course examines the lives of children and the evolving concept of "childhood" from the colonial era to the present. Looking at social and cultural variability across class, gender, time and race, it offers a nuanced portrait of the nation as it developed. (Pass/Fail option) Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 256S - Roman Empire

After setting the background for the empire through a look at the Republic period, course will trace the initial steps toward a new form of government for Rome and continue into the seventh century, when the eastern half of that empire was profoundly changed by its wars with Persia and the loss of some of its territories to new regional powers. Course will cover social, religious, and cultural history along with the political and military developments, and it will examine controversies among scholars about when the Empire ended. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 259S - Colonial Latin America

Major developments in Spanish and Portuguese America from just before the arrival of Europeans to the independence movements in the early nineteenth century roughly 1492-1825. Main questions addressed include how Spain and Portugal could maintain control over such a large region so far away, how the colonized peoples resisted foreign control and accommodated it, how the conflicts and shifting alliances among imperial authorities, colonists, and racially diverse labor class shaped the development of society, and how the independence movements arose and progressed. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 260S - Modern Latin America

History of Latin America from independence to the present. Analysis of political, social, economic and cultural events with special emphasis on migration of peoples; impact of racial, ethnic, gender, and religious differences; effects of cross-cultural contact; and modernization. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 261S - History of Mexico

History of Mexico from the earliest evidence of indigenous society to the present, with major emphasis on the past 1000 years. Analysis of political, social, economic and cultural change and continuity especially with respect to state and religious institutions; the effects of cross-cultural contact; the impact of racial, gender and class differences; and the movement of peoples within and across national borders. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 262S - Undeclared Wars

From the routine invasions of Mexico and other Latin American nations at the beginning of the 20th Century to the wars in Iraq in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, this course examines the undeclared wars and various military operations that have seen Americans in harm's way without formal Congressional declaration. (Pass/Fail option) Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 263S - Cold War America

This course offers an in-depth examination of the tumultuous relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union. Primarily a social and cultural history of the conflict as it unfolded in the lives of American citizens, the course explores both the historical and historiographical issues that dominate the field of study. (Pass/Fail option) Every three years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 271S - History of Medicine

This course explores the historical relationships between disease and health and American society from the multiple perspectives of class, race, gender and ethnicity. Major themes include: changing concepts of disease; the growth of scientific medicine and medical institutions; environmental and occupational health; "alternative" medicine; public health and hygiene; and epidemics from smallpox to AIDS. Category III. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 274S - Mediterranean World 1200 to 1700

Although this course will include material on Southern Europe, the Near East, and North Africa, the main emphasis will be on the interactions among and across these regions. Topics will include trading relationships, pilgrimage, artistic blending, alliances, and wars. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 277 - Topics in History

The study of specific topics in history focusing on areas of expertise of the history faculty. Some examples would include Women at Work, Farmington After 200 Years, War and Society, etc. Varies. Concentration depends on content.



Credit: 4

  HTY 310 - Revolutions in the Atlantic World

This history course juxtaposes three revolutionary movements: the one led to the independence of the United States, the one that precipitated the fall of the French monarchy, and the one that resulted in the largest slave rebellion in the history of the world. We will treat the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions in isolation before delving into the world of comparative history. We will pay particular attention to revolutionary ideologies, changing social structures, and the relative impact of each revolution on the wider world. Pre-requisites: None. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION



Credit: 4

  HTY 332 - The Turbulent 1960s

This course will study the social, cultural, political, intellectual, and artisitic developments of one of the most pivotal periods in U.S. history, the 1960's. Every two years. UNITED STATES CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 353 - Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Covers this conflict from the first stirrings of nationalism on both sides in the 19th century until the present time. Topics include early Zionism, Ottoman rule, the impact of World War I on the region, the British Mandate period, the impact of World War II and the wars of 1948, along with the Suez crisis of 1956 and the wars in 1967, 1973, 1982, and the Intifadas. Course will also cover peace efforts and the political developments among Israelis and Palestinians. Every three years. GLOBAL CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 377 - Topics in History

The study of topics in history focusing on areas of expertise of the history faculty. Topics would be similar to those listed for HTY 277 but on a more advanced level. Varies. Concentration depends on content.



Credit: 4

  HTY 390 - Research Methods

HTY 390 is the first step in completing the Senior Thesis (HTY 400). The course will focus on developing topics, literature reviews, developing hypotheses, organizing papers, research methods, and writing techniques. By the completion of the course, students will have crafted a proposal for their senior thesis following the model with complete bibliography, source list, and all other components of a working plan for their capstone project. Required for all history major seniors. Prerequisite(s): Senior History majors or Permission of Instructor. Every semester. METHODS AND RESEARCH CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 396 - Internship in History

The internship experience requires the application of prior academic History course work. Proposals should be developed in consultation with a faculty member and submitted in writing to the Chairperson of the Division of Social Sciences and Business for approval prior to registration. Upon the conclusion of the internship, the student must submit a comprehensive report on the experience to the supervising faculty member. Multiple or repeat registrations which are allowed, to a maximum of 16 credits earned. For example no student may thus enroll for more than four 4 credit internships. Credits will be allowed on the basis of 32 hours of field work per credit. (Pass/Fail option.) Variable. Offered when needed.



Credit: 1-16

  HTY 397 - Independent Study in History

The intermediate or advanced student will work under the direction of a faculty member on a topic chosen by mutual agreement. Prerequisite(s): Completed independent study form. (Pass/Fail option) Credit total varies. Concentration depends on content.



Credit: 4

  HTY 400 - Research Seminar

A course designed to be a culminating experience for students with a history major or specialization. Course concentrates on historiography, research design, primary and secondary research, analysis, and research writing in history. Prerequisite(s): HTY 390. Every semester. METHODS AND RESEARCH CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 450 - History Thesis

Open to highly qualified senior history majors. Students are expected to write a sophisticated research paper, under the supervision of a faculty sponsor and then defend it at a formal oral examination before the sponsor and at least two other faculty members agreed upon by the student and the sponsor. A research plan must be prepared prior to the term in which the course is taken and must be approved by both the sponsor and a majority of the history faculty members. Ideally, students intending to write a thesis should begin formulating a research topic during the spring of the junior year. This course can be substituted for HTY 400. Prerequisite(s): History majors only; permission of instructor.  As needed. METHODS AND RESEARCH CONCENTRATION.



Credit: 4

  HTY 477 - Topics in History

The study of a specialized topic not offered in the usual curriculum. Varies. Concentration depends on content.



Credit: 2-4

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