University of Maine at Farmington 2020-2021 Catalog

 
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Psychology
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  PSY 101S - General Psychology

This course provides a broad overview of the field of psychology. Topics include the history of psychology, the nature of psychological research, physiological processes, sensation, perception, human development, learning, cognition, language, motivation, emotion, personality, social psychology, stress, psychopathology, and therapy. Relevant cultural differences are discussed. Prerequisite(s): None. Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 104S - Parenting the Young Child

Exploration of the changing role of the parent in the development of the young child from pregnancy to the age of 5. Emphasis is placed on supporting cognitive, social, and emotional development. Prerequisite(s): None. Odd fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 105S - Personal Development and Psychological Well-Being

This course takes a counseling approach to personal growth and well-being. It provides an opportunity to apply psychological principles to understanding one's life. Drawing from Humanistic Psychology, the course emphasizes the importance of personal choice and responsibility. Topics will include finding meaning in life, becoming autonomous, developing meaningful relationships, managing stress, balancing work and play, appreciating one's body, sexuality, and making career choices. Active participation and reflection required. Pass/Fail Only. Prerequisite(s): None. Every spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 106 - Self-Determination: Theory and Practice

This course will use theory of motivation to understand academic development and success.  Self-determination theory suggests that if the basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness are met then intrinsic motivation will flourish.  Students will apply an understanding of these basic psychological needs to their own motivation, especially as it relates to academic success.  Topics will include mindset, goal-setting, self-regulation, and work habits. Prerequisite(s): None. Varied, offered Winter and May terms only.



Credit: 4

  PSY 177 - Topics in Psychology
This course involves the study of introductory topics in the field of psychology not offered in the regular curriculum. Course topic is determined by the individual instructor. Prerequisite(s): none. (Pass/Fail option) Varies.


Credit: 2-4

  PSY 198 - Theory and Practice Seminar I

This seminar provides an opportunity for students interested in counseling and social work careers to study relevant issues in considerable depth. Topics will include counseling approaches, current issues and controversies in counseling and social work, and the development of skills needed to be an effective professional. The interactive, discussion-based format of the course encourages students to develop a rich understanding of counseling theory and to build skills related to the practice of counseling. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Every semester.



Credit: 2

  PSY 202S - Psychology in Cinema
Until recently, most information about psychology was 'learned' from moviegoers. Our Maine State Legislature, comprised of working-class citizens from all walks of life, make decisions about funding and access to mental health care -- but where did they develop their understanding of these issues? A wide range of psychological phenomena will be explored through the viewing, discussion, and analysis of award-winning and groundbreaking films. Have psychological disorders and treatments been presented accurately to the public? Do these films champion or malign available mental health practices? Have these powerful portrayals of psychological phenomena colored our public discourse, policy, and funding for access to mental health care? Have these films influenced our culture's understanding of mental illness? Directorial techniques impacting viewers' perceptions, including choices for casting, music, lighting, props, and closing credits will be explored. Hollywood's portrayals of ethnicity, gender, class, and cultural are also explored. Prerequisite(s): None. Every fall.


Credit: 4

  PSY 208 - Social Psychology

This course examines the social psychology of relationships, attitude formation and change, interpersonal influence, and group dynamics. Social psychology emphasizes the importance of the social context in understanding individuals and groups. Students will explore classic studies as well as recent trends and findings in the field. Research and theories pertaining to such issues as conformity, cognitive dissonance, aggression, social comparison, stereotyping, prejudice, and attraction are discussed. Relevant cultural differences are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor. Every spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 209 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines various issues pertaining to abnormal human behavior. Major emphasis is placed on anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenias, and personality disorders. The diagnosis, symptoms, causes, and treatment of disorders are also discussed. Where appropriate, mental disorders are considered from a variety of cultural perspectives. Disorders found in various regions of the world are discussed.  Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 211 - Psychology of Learning and Behavioral Change

The major theories of learning proposed by Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner, Bandura, Piaget, Tolman, and others are discussed. Theoretical tensions among these theories are analyzed and special attention is focused on the potential applications of these theories in various settings, including education and mental health. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. Odd Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 220 - Psychology of Gender

This course examines the latest psychological theory and research on gender, including theory on the development of gender roles in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. In addition, by using gender as a primary component of inquiry, students examine relationships (family, romantic and workplace relationships), achievement, sexual orientation, emotion, mental health, and therapy. Prerequisites: PSY 101S or PSY 225S. Even Fall. 



Credit: 4

  PSY 222 - Creativity and Intelligence

This course examines creativity in relation to intelligence, personality traits and the social context.  Methods to stimulate creativity in children and adults are analyzed and compared.  Behaviors that tend to stifle creativity are also examined. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. (Pass/Fail option) Even Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 225S - Child and Adolescent Development

This course is designed to expose students to the complexities of development from conception through adolescence. Emphasis will be placed on relations among physical, cognitive and social development in a variety of contexts and cultures. Prerequisite(s): None. Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 226 - Adulthood and Aging

This course provides a survey of psychological theory and research pertaining to adult development and aging. Special attention is given to general theoretical issues in the study of adult development as well as to empirical research relevant to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that accompany the aging process. Cultural variations in developmental processes will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): None. Every Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 230 - Death and Dying

This course examines the experiences and needs of dying persons and their survivors. Cultural differences in approaches to the topic of death are also examined. Prerequisite(s): None. (Pass/Fail only). Every Fall. 



Credit: 4

  PSY 235 - Introduction to Counseling

This course introduces students to basic counseling skills and provides a survey of relevant theories of personality and psychopathology. Topics covered include psychological trauma, suicide risk assessment, intake assessment, case management fundamentals, and psychopharmacology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor. Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 237 - Career Counseling

This course explores various theories of career development. Methods and resources pertaining to career assessment, career guidance and counseling, and program development are presented. Job seeking and retention skills are also discussed. Unique issues that emerge when career counselors work with minorities, persons with disabilities and other culturally diverse populations are considered. This course meets the course requirements for Maine's MHRT-C Vocational Aspects of Disability. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of the instructor. Every Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 247 - The Psychology of Leadership

This course examines several correlates of leadership, including creativity, intelligence, social forces, personality and motivational characteristics. Current and historical leaders in politics, business, science and the arts will be discussed, and students will have the opportunity to try out leadership techniques first hand. Prerequisite(s): PSY101S or permission of the instructor. Every Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 252 - Positive Psychology

This course examines the contemporary movement within psychology to examine the causes and correlates of human well-being. Course participants will consider the latest scientific research on optimism, hope, resilience, altruism, creativity, spirituality, and creating a fulfilling and meaningful life. Research findings will be considered in terms of individual growth, human relationships, and peaceable communities. Prerequisite(s):  None. Every Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 259 - Evolutionary Psychology

This course is the synthesis of principles of modern evolutionary biology and modern psychology. Basic principles such as survival, short- and long-term mating strategies, parenting, and kinship will be covered. Significant attention will also be focused on various issues of group living, including cooperative alliances, aggressive behaviors, status and social dominance. In addition, the scientific movements leading toward the emergence of Evolutionary Psychology will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or Permission of instructor. Even Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 275 - Statistical Applications to Psychology

This course fosters the development of the basic statistical skills that psychology majors need in order to organize data, perform elementary statistical computations, and interpret the results. The role played by statistics in the research enterprise is also discussed. The statistical analyses covered include t-tests, non-parametric tests, one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, correlations, linear regression, and multiple regression. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Odd Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 277 - Intermediate Topics in Psychology
This course involves the study of intermediate-level topics in the field of psychology not offered in the regular curriculum. Course topic is determined by the individual instructor. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. (Pass/Fail option) Varies.


Credit: 2-4

  PSY 284 - Professional Seminar

The purpose of this course is to explore the psychological literature pertaining to issues of concern to basic and applied psychologists.   Special attention will be focused on (a) the literature review process, (b) the critical evaluation of scholarly journal articles, and (c) the development of writing skills appropriate to the discipline of psychology (including APA Style formatting of scholarly manuscripts).  Each section of this class will focus on a single issue or topic selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: Psychology major, sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Every Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 298 - Theory and Practice Seminar II

This seminar provides an opportunity for students interested in counseling and social work careers to study relevant issues in considerable depth. Topics will include counseling approaches, current issues and controversies in counseling and social work, and the development of skills needed to be an effective professional. The interactive, discussion-based format of the course encourages students to develop a rich understanding of counseling theory and to build skills related to the practice of counseling. Students enrolled in PSY 298 will complete a service learning project and prepare a formal analysis of their experience based on counseling theory. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Every semester.



Credit: 2

  PSY 300 - Transpersonal and Eastern Psychology

This course examines Eastern and Western psychological theory, systems of inquiry, and experiential methodologies that strive to move individuals beyond self-centered behavior and ordinary states of consciousness. Transpersonal systems in modern psychology, Hinduism, Buddhism, Yoga, and Christianity as well as those found in other cross-cultural traditions will be explored using a holistic teaching approach that facilitates both critical analysis as well as experiential understanding. A sample of additional class topics include meditation and metacognitive research/practice, skepticism and belief, expectancy effects, altered states of consciousness, limitations of objective and subjective research, cults, stages of faith, transpersonal paradoxes, contradictions, and inherent limitations. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or higher, PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Odd Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 302 - Sensation and Perception

This course examines the relationship between sensation as a physiological process and perception as a psychological phenomenon.  Special attention will be given to the physiology and psychology of vision, audition, and the development of the senses.  In addition, the course will explore interactions among perception, learning, the social context, and neurophysiology. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S. Even Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 305 - Ethical Principles in Counseling

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore professional and ethical issues that affect the practice of counseling and other helping professions. Professional and ethical guidelines will be considered, with a special focus on the challenges associated with applying these guidelines to typical counseling scenarios. Legal and ethical issues explored include boundaries, confidentiality, and client rights and responsibilities, as well as multicultural competencies with respect to ethical practice. Prerequisites: PSY 101S or PSY 225S. Every fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 314 - Cognitive Psychology

This course explores the foundations and applications of contemporary cognitive psychology. Attention will be given to general theoretical issues in the field as well as to such topics as memory, problem solving, attention, language, and the physiological basis of human cognition. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or permission of instructor. Odd Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 315 - Physiological Psychology

This course involves an exploration of the basic anatomical systems and physiological processes that underlie human behavior. Special attention will be placed on the biological underpinnings of sensation, cognition, emotion, motivation, learning, and various psychological disorders. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or BIO 150N. Odd Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 317 - I/O: Personnel Psychology

The psychology of the workplace applies basic theories to developing best practices for creating productive, healthy, and satisfying workplace experiences and outcomes. Beginning with the basics of understanding the job itself using job analysis, design, and evaluation, we then explore techniques for recruiting, selecting, and then placing individuals in the right jobs. Once selected, further tasks of personnel psychology include training, performance appraisal systems, job satisfaction, and motivation. Workforce diversity and relevant cultural differences are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. (Pass-fail option) Every fall. 



Credit: 4

  PSY 327 - Diversity and Multiculturalism

This course explores the many ways in which diversity and multiculturalism are relevant to issues in counseling, employment, and civic engagement.  Various perspectives regarding how we and others understand terms such as race, ethnicity, nationality, self-identification, and multicultural competence will be considered.  Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. (Pass/Fail option) Even Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 329 - Child and Family Counseling and Psychopathology

The specialized theories and techniques for understanding and working with children and families in various cultural contexts are explored. The course also examines various individual and systemic pathologies that affect children and families. Mental disorders of children and transitional crises of families are discussed, including pervasive developmental disorders, attentional disorders, conduct disorders, mood disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse, divorce, and family violence and victimization. Related ethical and legal issues are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Every Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 347 - The Psychology of Persuasion

This course focuses on the psychology of influence, and has applications for marketing, non-profit organizations, the service industry, and consumers. The ethics of compliance techniques will also be discussed. A business negotiation can be broken down into simple psychological principles. That is a major emphasis in this course. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. Odd Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 349 - Couples Therapy

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of couples counseling, including theories of committed relationships.  Students will analyze videos of experts in the field working with actual couples. They will also practice basic couple counseling skills. Topics include the history of couple therapy, research on committed relationships, and emotion-focused couple therapy. Special issues will also be covered including infidelity, parenting, and sexuality in committed relationships. Prerequisite(s): PSY 235, REH 200, PSY 329, or permission of instructor. Every spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 350 - Personality Theory and Research

This course provides a broad overview of theory and research pertaining to human personality. Psychodynamic, trait, cognitive, and humanistic approaches are reviewed and relevant empirical research are critically evaluated. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S or permission of instructor.  Even Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 360 - Group Psychotherapy

Students in this course will explore the fundamentals of group dynamics and leadership strategies in an experiential group setting. Emphasis is placed upon enhancing emotional intelligence, personal development, self-efficacy and awareness of group norms. Active participation is required. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 377 - Advanced Topics in Psychology

This course involves the study of advanced topics in the field of psychology not offered in the regular curriculum. Course topic is determined by the individual instructor. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S. (Pass/Fail option). Varies.



Credit: 2-4

  PSY 380 - Seminar in Psychology: Autism

Students will work regularly with children with autism on a one-to-one basis in a camp environment. There will be one week of training with the support of the Autism Society of Maine. This will be followed by two two-week sessions with intensive interaction with the children. The first session will be with adolescents and the second session will be with school age children.  Activities will include games, crafts, music, and art in a structured and therapeutic off-campus environment. Every year.



Credit: 2-4

  PSY 396 - Field Experience in Psychology

This course involves participation in a community-based learning experience.  Students will be supervised by an individual UMF Psychology faculty member.   Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S and permission of instructor. Varies.



Credit: 1-8

  PSY 397 - Independent Study and Research in Psychology

Individual students are provided with an opportunity to examine a topic in greater depth than is possible in regular psychology course offerings. Participation in this course may require an extensive survey of a relevant topic or an original research project. The topic, the credits the student will earn, and the responsibilities of the student, must be approved by the division chair.  Prerequisite(s): Three (3) courses in psychology and permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail option) Varies.



Credit: 1-8

  PSY 398 - Theory and Practice Seminar III

This seminar provides an opportunity for students interested in counseling and social work careers to study relevant issues in considerable depth. Topics will include counseling approaches, current issues and controversies in counseling and social work, and the development of skills needed to be an effective professional. The interactive, discussion-based format of the course encourages students to develop a rich understanding of counseling theory and to build skills related to the practice of counseling. Students enrolled in PSY 398 will be expected to assume leadership roles in the seminar. Such roles include selecting special topics for discussion, preparing reading lists, leading discussions, and peer mentoring. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Every semester.



Credit: 2

  PSY 400 - Research Methods in Psychology

The primary focus of this course is the scientific methodologies relevant to inquiries in the social sciences. Both single-subject and group methodologies are considered. Special emphasis is placed on collecting and analyzing data. Students conduct original research and present their findings at the conclusion of the term. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S and a statistics course ( MAT 120M or MAT 220 or PSY 275). Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 425 - Sex Therapy

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of sex therapy. The class will be conducted as a discussion-based seminar and students will be responsible for presenting and discussing readings. Topics will include the treatment of several disorders: sexual arousal disorder, sexual pain, orgasmic disorders, erectile disorder, premature ejaculation, and delayed ejaculation, as well as paraphilias and sexual addiction. The history of the field of sex therapy, and societal and cultural influences on sexuality and sexual disorders will also be discussed. Prerequisites: Abnormal Psychology (PSY 209), Introduction to Counseling (PSY 235) and an advanced counseling course (PSY 329, PSY 349, or PSY 435) or permission of the instructor. Every 3 years Spring semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 435 - Psychotherapeutic Methods

This course is an advanced follow-up to PSY 235. Counseling and case management skills are taught experientially. Working in pairs, students initially practice counseling skills and subsequently interview volunteers who share accounts of real life issues. Emphasis is placed on motivational interviewing, problem conceptualization, goal setting, helping skills, and cognitive behavioral strategies. This course is particularly useful for students pursuing employment or graduate work in human service areas that involve counseling. Prerequisite(s): PSY 209 and PSY 235 or permission of instructor. Even Fall and every Spring.



Credit: 4

  PSY 440 - Psychology and Law

Mental health professionals who are well educated in the law can play an important role in resolving child custody, competency, criminal responsibility, witness credibility, disability, and other issues in criminal and civil cases. We will study the laws that mental health professionals need to know and we will carefully examine real-life legal cases involving caseworkers, therapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, community health workers, and other mental health professionals. Taught by a lawyer with many years of courtroom experience, this course will help prepare those interested in a career in mental health to meet the legal challenges that will inevitably come their way. Prerequisites: PSY 101S or PSY 225S. Once every two years.



Credit: 4

  PSY 455 - Crisis Intervention and Stabilization

This course reviews the basic concepts and skills needed to effectively perform mental health assessments, stabilization, and referral in a crisis situation.  Topics to be considered include diagnosis, psychotropic medications, the process of identifying and reporting abuse, techniques for dealing with violent persons, involuntary hospitalizations, and relevant community support services.  Professional and ethical issues will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): A counseling course (PSY 235 or REH 200 or equivalent) and PSY 209. (Pass/Fail option) Every Fall.



Credit: 4

  PSY 477 - Specialized Topics in Psychology

This course involves the study of highly specialized, advanced topics in psychology not offered in the regular curriculum. Course topic is determined by the individual instructor. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S or PSY 225S and others as determined by the instructor. (Pass/Fail option)  Varies.



Credit: 2-4

  PSY 480 - Advanced Autism

Students will work regularly with children with autism on a one-to-one basis in a camp environment. There will be one week of training and then two two-week sessions. One session will be with adolescents with autism and the second session will be with school age children with autism. Students will be in charge of planning camp activities. They will also act as mentors for students enrolled in PSY 380. Prerequisites: PSY 380 and permission of instructor, (Pass/Fail option) Every Summer.



Credit: 2-4

  PSY 484 - Senior Seminar

This course involves a critical analysis of classic and contemporary texts relevant to the work of psychologists.  All psychology majors will be exposed to cross cultural issues in this class. Text selection will enable students to explore issues of racial, ethnic, or gender diversity. As the Psychology and Human Development Division's capstone course, PSY 484 requires extensive reading, writing, and critical reflection. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S and PSY 400, or permission of instructor. Every semester.



Credit: 4

  PSY 496 - Internship in Psychology

This course provides an in-depth, practical experience in psychology. A proposal will be worked out in consultation with a psychology faculty member who will supervise the experience. The proposal must be submitted in writing to the Chair of the Psychology and Human Development Division for approval. At the conclusion of the internship, the student will submit a comprehensive report regarding the experience to the supervising faculty member. Not available to students who have completed an internship in another division. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and 24 credits in psychology (excluding PSY 396 and 397) and permission of instructor. (Pass/Fail only) Varies.



Credit: 4-16

  PSY 499 - Senior Thesis

This course, which can be taken in lieu of Senior Seminar (PSY 484), involves independent scholarly work in psychology. A proposal will be worked out in consultation with a psychology faculty member who will supervise the thesis. At the end of the course, the student will submit a final written thesis and will present an oral defense to the supervising faculty member. Other available faculty members of the division will be invited to participate in the thesis defense. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101S and PSY 400, and permission of instructor. As needed.



Credit: 4

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